Author Topic: MAVEN Mission to Mars  (Read 3561 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
MAVEN Mission to Mars
« on: Sep 18, 2008, 17:29:53 »
Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission go for 2013

NASA has announced it will in 2013 send a robotic mission to Mars to sniff the Red Planet's atmosphere and gain insights into how most of it was lost.

The $485m Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft - judged as boasting the "best science value and lowest implementation risk" of 20 mission proposals - will "make definitive scientific measurements of present-day atmospheric loss that will offer clues about the planet's history".

More: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/09/16/mars_maven/
« Last Edit: Mar 20, 2015, 21:43:01 by Rick »

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
Nasa selects Mars climate mission
« Reply #1 on: Sep 18, 2008, 17:34:20 »
The US space agency (Nasa) has approved its next orbiter mission to Mars.

The Maven spacecraft will arrive at the Red Planet in late 2014, to study the atmosphere and climate history of Earth's near neighbour.

The satellite will be equipped with eight scientific instruments and will fly low enough on occasions to sample the upper layers of Martian "air".

It could also provide a communications link to Earth for surface robots, such as Europe's ExoMars rover.

More: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7618344.stm

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
MAVEN Mission to Mars
« Reply #2 on: Nov 19, 2013, 08:42:38 »
NASA Launches Mission to Study Upper Atmosphere of Mars

A NASA mission that will investigate how Mars lost its atmosphere and abundant liquid water launched into space at 1:28 p.m. EST Monday from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

The agency's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft separated from an Atlas V Centaur rocket's second stage 53 minutes after launch. The solar arrays deployed approximately one hour after launch and currently power the spacecraft. MAVEN now is embarking on a 10-month interplanetary cruise before arriving at Mars next September.

"MAVEN joins our orbiters and rovers already at Mars to explore yet another facet of the Red Planet and prepare for human missions there by the 2030s," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said. "This mission is part of an integrated and strategic exploration program that is uncovering the mysteries of the solar system and enabling us to reach farther destinations."

In the next four weeks, MAVEN will power on and check out each of its eight instruments. Upon arrival at Mars in September, the spacecraft will execute an orbit insertion maneuver, firing six thrusters that will allow it to be captured by Mars' orbit. In the following five weeks, MAVEN will establish itself in an orbit where it can conduct science operations, deploy science appendages, and commission all instruments before starting its one-Earth-year scientific primary mission.

More: http://www.nasa.gov/press/2013/november/nasa-launches-mission-to-study-upper-atmosphere-of-mars/
Mission: http://www.nasa.gov/maven

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
NASA's MAVEN Spacecraft Makes Final Preparations For Mars
« Reply #3 on: Sep 09, 2014, 10:14:40 »
NASA's MAVEN Spacecraft Makes Final Preparations For Mars

On Sept. 21, 2014, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft will complete roughly 10 months of travel and enter orbit around the Red Planet.

The orbit-insertion maneuver will be carried out as the spacecraft approaches Mars, wrapping up an interplanetary journey of 442 million miles (711 million kilometers). Six thruster engines will fire briefly for a “settling” burn that damps out deviations in pointing. Then the six main engines will ignite two by two in quick succession and will burn for 33 minutes to slow the craft, allowing it to be captured in an elliptical orbit.

This milestone will mark the culmination of 11 years of concept and development for MAVEN, setting the stage for the mission’s science phase, which will investigate Mars as no other mission has.

More here

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
NASA's Newest Mars Mission Spacecraft Enters Orbit around Red Planet

NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft successfully entered Mars' orbit at 7:24 p.m. PDT (10:24 p.m. EDT) Sunday, Sept. 21, where it now will prepare to study the Red Planet's upper atmosphere as never done before. MAVEN is the first spacecraft dedicated to exploring the tenuous upper atmosphere of Mars.

"As the first orbiter dedicated to studying Mars' upper atmosphere, MAVEN will greatly improve our understanding of the history of the Martian atmosphere, how the climate has changed over time, and how that has influenced the evolution of the surface and the potential habitability of the planet," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. "It also will better inform a future mission to send humans to the Red Planet in the 2030s."

After a 10-month journey, confirmation of successful orbit insertion was received from MAVEN data observed at the Lockheed Martin operations center in Littleton, Colorado, as well as from tracking data monitored at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory navigation facility in Pasadena, California. The telemetry and tracking data were received by NASA's Deep Space Network antenna station in Canberra, Australia.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2014-318

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
NASA Mission Provides Its First Look at Martian Upper Atmosphere
« Reply #5 on: Oct 15, 2014, 07:59:21 »
NASA Mission Provides Its First Look at Martian Upper Atmosphere


Three views of an escaping atmosphere, obtained by MAVEN's Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph, are shown here. Image Credit: NASA/Univ. of Colorado
› Full image and caption

NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft has provided scientists their first look at a storm of energetic solar particles at Mars, produced unprecedented ultraviolet images of the tenuous oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon coronas surrounding the Red Planet, and yielded a comprehensive map of highly variable ozone in the atmosphere underlying the coronas.

The spacecraft, which entered Mars' orbit Sept. 21, now is lowering its orbit and testing its instruments. MAVEN was launched to Mars in November 2013, to help solve the mystery of how the Red Planet lost most of its atmosphere.

"All the instruments are showing data quality that is better than anticipated at this early stage of the mission," said Bruce Jakosky, MAVEN principal investigator at the University of Colorado, Boulder. "All instruments have now been turned on -- although not yet fully checked out -- and are functioning nominally. It's turning out to be an easy and straightforward spacecraft to fly, at least so far. It really looks as if we're headed for an exciting science mission."

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4334

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
Newest NASA Mars Orbiter Demonstrates Relay Prowess
« Reply #6 on: Nov 15, 2014, 10:07:23 »
Newest NASA Mars Orbiter Demonstrates Relay Prowess

The newest node in NASA's Mars telecommunications network -- a radio aboard the MAVEN orbiter custom-designed for data links with robots on the surface of Mars -- handled a copious 550 megabits during its first relay of real Mars data.

MAVEN's Electra UHF radio received the transmission from NASA's Curiosity Mars rover on Nov. 6, using an adaptive data rate as the orbiter passed through the sky over the rover. The data that MAVEN relayed to NASA's Deep Space Network of large dish antennas on Earth included several images of terrain that Curiosity has been examining at the base of Mars' Mount Sharp. The test also included relaying data to Curiosity from Earth via MAVEN.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4370

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
NASA Spacecraft Detects Aurora and Mysterious Dust Cloud around Mars

NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft has observed two unexpected phenomena in the Martian atmosphere: an unexplained high-altitude dust cloud and aurora that reaches deep into the Martian atmosphere.

The presence of the dust at orbital altitudes from about 93 miles (150 kilometers) to 190 miles (300 kilometers) above the surface was not predicted. Although the source and composition of the dust are unknown, there is no hazard to MAVEN and other spacecraft orbiting Mars.

"If the dust originates from the atmosphere, this suggests we are missing some fundamental process in the Martian atmosphere," said Laila Andersson of the University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospherics and Space Physics (CU LASP), Boulder, Colorado.

More: http://www.nasa.gov/press/2015/march/nasa-spacecraft-detects-aurora-and-mysterious-dust-cloud-around-mars/

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
Auroras on Mars
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2015, 14:19:44 »
Auroras on Mars

 In late Dec. 2014, NASA's MAVEN spacecraft detected evidence of widespread auroras in Mars's northern hemisphere.  The "Christmas Lights," as researchers called them, circled the globe and descended so close to the Martian equator that, if the lights had occurred on Earth, they would have been over places like Florida and Texas.

"It really is amazing," says Nick Schneider who leads MAVEN's Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument team at the University of Colorado.  "Auroras on Mars appear to be more wide ranging than we ever imagined."

More: http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2015/11may_aurorasonmars/

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
NASA Mission Reveals Speed of Solar Wind Stripping Martian Atmosphere

NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission has identified the process that appears to have played a key role in the transition of the Martian climate from an early, warm and wet environment that might have supported surface life to the cold, arid planet Mars is today.

MAVEN data have enabled researchers to determine the rate at which the Martian atmosphere currently is losing gas to space via stripping by the solar wind. The findings reveal that the erosion of Mars’ atmosphere increases significantly during solar storms. The scientific results from the mission appear in the Nov. 5 issues of the journals Science and Geophysical Research Letters.

“Mars appears to have had a thick atmosphere warm enough to support liquid water which is a key ingredient and medium for life as we currently know it,” said John Grunsfeld, astronaut and associate administrator for the NASA Science Mission Directorate in Washington. “Understanding what happened to the Mars atmosphere will inform our knowledge of the dynamics and evolution of any planetary atmosphere. Learning what can cause changes to a planet’s environment from one that could host microbes at the surface to one that doesn’t is important to know, and is a key question that is being addressed in NASA’s journey to Mars.”

More: https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-mission-reveals-speed-of-solar-wind-stripping-martian-atmosphere

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
Loss of Carbon in Martian Atmosphere Explained
« Reply #10 on: Nov 25, 2015, 09:56:52 »
Loss of Carbon in Martian Atmosphere Explained

Mars is blanketed by a thin, mostly carbon dioxide atmosphere -- one that is far too thin to keep water from freezing or quickly evaporating. However, geological evidence has led scientists to conclude that ancient Mars was once a warmer, wetter place than it is today. To produce a more temperate climate, several researchers have suggested that the planet was once shrouded in a much thicker carbon dioxide atmosphere. For decades that left the question, "Where did all the carbon go?"

The solar wind stripped away much of Mars' ancient atmosphere and is still removing tons of it every day. But scientists have been puzzled by why they haven't found more carbon -- in the form of carbonate -- captured into Martian rocks. They have also sought to explain the ratio of heavier and lighter carbons in the modern Martian atmosphere.

Now a team of scientists from the California Institute of Technology and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, both in Pasadena, offer an explanation of the "missing" carbon, in a paper published today by the journal Nature Communications.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4778

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
MAVEN Observes Mars Moon Phobos in the Mid- and Far-Ultraviolet
« Reply #11 on: Mar 01, 2016, 22:49:44 »
MAVEN Observes Mars Moon Phobos in the Mid- and Far-Ultraviolet

NASA scientists are closer to solving the mystery of how Mars’ moon Phobos formed.

In late November and early December 2015, NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission made a series of close approaches to the Martian moon Phobos, collecting data from within 300 miles (500 kilometers) of the moon.

Among the data returned were spectral images of Phobos in the ultraviolet. The images will allow MAVEN scientists to better assess the composition of this enigmatic object, whose origin is unknown.

More: http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/maven-observes-phobos-in-ultraviolet

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
Close Comet Flyby Threw Mars' Magnetic Field Into Chaos
« Reply #12 on: Mar 18, 2016, 09:47:06 »
Close Comet Flyby Threw Mars' Magnetic Field Into Chaos

Just weeks before the historic encounter of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) with Mars in October 2014, NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft entered orbit around the Red Planet. To protect sensitive equipment aboard MAVEN from possible harm, some instruments were turned off during the flyby; the same was done for other Mars orbiters. But a few instruments, including MAVEN's magnetometer, remained on, conducting observations from a front-row seat during the comet's remarkably close flyby.

The one-of-a-kind opportunity gave scientists an intimate view of the havoc that the comet's passing wreaked on the magnetic environment, or magnetosphere, around Mars. The effect was temporary but profound.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=5747

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
MAVEN Orbiter Steers Clear of Mars Moon Phobos
« Reply #13 on: Mar 04, 2017, 09:10:16 »
MAVEN Orbiter Steers Clear of Mars Moon Phobos

NASA's MAVEN spacecraft performed a previously unscheduled maneuver this week to avoid a collision in the near future with Mars' moon Phobos.

The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft has been orbiting Mars for just over two years, studying the Red Planet's upper atmosphere, ionosphere and interactions with the sun and solar wind. On Tuesday, Feb. 28, the spacecraft carried out a rocket motor burn that boosted its velocity by 0.4 meters per second (less than 1 mile per hour). Although a small correction, it was enough that -- projected to one week later when the collision would otherwise have occurred -- MAVEN would miss the lumpy, crater-filled moon by about 2.5 minutes.

More: https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6764

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6567
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
Q: What’s big, red and pulses UV light into the cosmos three times a night? A: Mars

Mars pulses with ultraviolet light three times a night during spring and autumn, according to boffins from the University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP).

More: https://www.theregister.com/2020/08/07/mars_nightglow/