• Welcome to Orpington Astronomical Society.
 

News:

New version SMF 2.1.2 installed. You may need to clear cookies and login again...

Main Menu

Black hole: First picture of Milky Way monster

Started by Rick, May 12, 2022, 16:32:53

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Rick

Black hole: First picture of Milky Way monster

Known as Sagittarius A*, the object is a staggering four million times the mass of our Sun.

What you see is a central dark region where the hole resides, circled by the light coming from super-heated gas accelerated by immense gravitational forces.

More: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-61412463

Mac

Nasa released an image back in 2013 of the black hole, https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/multimedia/black-hole-SagittariusA.html
So technically its not the first, plus there are other images and videos of the stars all orbiting the black hole.

Its still a cool image though.
and gets a lot more people interested.

Mac.
Never, ever, argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.
If you argue with an idiot, there are two idiots.

Rick

It'd be interesting to see those various images at the same scale.

Mac

This was also interesting.

A Time lapse of the stars orbiting the black hole.
Taken over a few weekends.
(1000) ish.  :lol:

20 year time lapse

20 year time lapse Sagatarius A black hole.
Never, ever, argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.
If you argue with an idiot, there are two idiots.

Rick

I remember seeing the first video of those stars quite a few years back ( See http://forum.orpington-astronomy.org.uk/index.php?topic=4094.0 from 2008). Interesting to see another decade-or-so's worth of data added to it, though.

Rick

Pictured: Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way

Eight ground-based telescopes located around the world were used to capture light from Sgr A* starting in 2017. Researchers gathered 3.5 petabytes of observations and fed that into complex image-processing algorithms running on supercomputers to construct the image. The data from these telescopes have to be carefully compared and processed; scientists have to take into account factors such as instrument position and the rotation of the Earth to build up a stable, direct image.

"The mass and distance of the object were known very precisely before our observations," said Luciano Rezzolla, professor of Theoretical Astrophysics at Goethe University Frankfurt, this week.

"We thus used these tight constraints on the size of the shadow to rule out other compact objects – such as boson stars or wormholes – and conclude that: 'What we're seeing definitely looks like a black hole.'"

More: https://www.theregister.com/2022/05/14/sagittarius_black_hole/