Author Topic: News of the Comet-hunting Rosetta mission  (Read 9461 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6318
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
Rosetta Comet Outburst Captured
« Reply #120 on: Aug 14, 2015, 08:55:24 »
Rosetta Comet Outburst Captured

The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft has been witnessing growing activity from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as the comet approaches perihelion (its closest point to the sun during its orbit). On July 29, while the spacecraft orbited at a distance of 116 miles (186 kilometers) from the comet, it observed the most dramatic outburst to date. Early science results collected during the outburst came from several instruments aboard Rosetta, including the Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS), which uses NASA-built electronics. The DFMS is part of the spacecraft's Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) instrument.

When the outburst occurred, the spectrometer recorded dramatic changes in the composition of outpouring gases from the comet when compared to measurements made two days earlier. As a result of the outburst, the amount of carbon dioxide increased by a factor of two, methane by four, and hydrogen sulfide by seven, while the amount of water stayed almost constant.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4687

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6318
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
Comet Surface Changes Before Rosetta's Eyes
« Reply #121 on: Sep 19, 2015, 09:34:25 »
Comet Surface Changes Before Rosetta's Eyes

Since arriving at Comet 67P/C-G in August 2014, Rosetta has been witnessing an increase in the activity of the comet, warmed by the ever-closer Sun. A general increase in the outflow of gas and dust has been punctuated by the emergence of jets and dramatic rapid outbursts in the weeks around perihelion, the closest point to the Sun on the comet’s orbit, which occurred on 13 August 2015.

But in June 2015, just two months before perihelion, Rosetta scientists started noticing important changes on the surface of the nucleus itself. These very significant alterations have been seen in Imhotep, a region containing smooth terrains covered by fine-grained material as well as large boulders, located on 67P/C-G’s large lobe.

More from ESA

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6318
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
Rosetta reveals comet's water-ice cycle
« Reply #122 on: Sep 25, 2015, 08:58:47 »
Rosetta reveals comet's water-ice cycle

A key feature that Rosetta's scientists are investigating is the way in which activity on the comet and the associated outgassing are driven, by monitoring the increasing activity on and around the comet since Rosetta's arrival.

Scientists using Rosetta's Visible, InfraRed and Thermal Imaging Spectrometer, VIRTIS, have identified a region on the comet's surface where water ice appears and disappears in sync with its rotation period. Their findings are published today in the journal Nature.

More from ESA

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6318
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
First Detection of Molecular Oxygen At A Comet
« Reply #123 on: Nov 02, 2015, 09:46:15 »
First Detection of Molecular Oxygen At A Comet

ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has made the first in situ detection of oxygen molecules outgassing from a comet, a surprising observation that suggests they were incorporated into the comet during its formation.

 Rosetta has been studying Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for over a year and has detected an abundance of different gases pouring from its nucleus. Water vapour, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are the most prolific, with a rich array of other nitrogen-, sulphur- and carbon-bearing species, and even 'noble gases' also recorded.

Oxygen is the third most abundant element in the Universe, but the simplest molecular version of the gas, O2, has proven surprisingly hard to track down, even in star-forming clouds, because it is highly reactive and readily breaks apart to bind with other atoms and molecules.

More from ESA

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6318
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
Rosetta Finds Magnetic Field-Free Bubble at Comet
« Reply #124 on: Mar 19, 2016, 09:50:55 »
Rosetta Finds Magnetic Field-Free Bubble at Comet

ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has revealed a surprisingly large region around its host comet devoid of any magnetic field.

When ESA's Giotto flew past Comet Halley three decades ago, it found a vast magnetic-free region extending more than 4000 km from the nucleus. This was the first observation of something that scientists had until then only thought about but had never seen.

Interplanetary space is pervaded by the solar wind, a flow of electrically charged particles streaming from the Sun and carrying its magnetic field across the Solar System. But a comet pouring lots of gas into space obstructs the solar wind.

t the interface between the solar wind and the coma of gas around the active comet, particle collisions as well as sunlight can knock out electrons from the molecules in the coma, which are ionised and picked up by the solar wind. This process slows the solar wind, diverting its flow around the comet and preventing it from directly impacting the nucleus.

More from ESA

JohnP

  • Non-OAS
  • Cluster Class
  • *
  • Posts: 1543
    • JP Astro Images
Philae found.. hooraaaa...!
« Reply #125 on: Sep 05, 2016, 15:44:33 »
Philae found.. hooraaaa...!

Less than a month before the end of the mission, Rosetta’s high-resolution camera has revealed the Philae lander wedged into a dark crack on Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.

The images were taken on 2 September by the OSIRIS narrow-angle camera as the orbiter came within 2.7 km of the surface and clearly show the main body of the lander, along with two of its three legs.

The images also provide proof of Philae’s orientation, making it clear why establishing communications was so difficult following its landing on 12 November 2014.

More: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Rosetta/Philae_found
« Last Edit: Sep 05, 2016, 22:43:30 by Rick »

Mike

  • Observing Consultant
  • O. A. S.
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 8487
    • Electronicle
Re: Philae found.. hooraaaa...!
« Reply #126 on: Sep 05, 2016, 16:30:07 »
yay!! \o/

Download the High-Res image from here and look at the amazing crumbly texture of the comet....

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/09/Philae_found
We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology. Carl Sagan

Carole

  • O. A. S.
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6945
    • Carole's images
Re: Philae found.. hooraaaa...!
« Reply #127 on: Sep 05, 2016, 17:01:32 »
OMG that is so tiny to be able to spot.

Amazing mission

Carole

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6318
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
NASA's Kepler Gets the 'Big Picture' of Comet 67P
« Reply #128 on: Oct 22, 2016, 10:54:47 »
NASA's Kepler Gets the 'Big Picture' of Comet 67P

On Sept. 30, the European Space Agency concluded its Rosetta mission and the study of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. During the final month of the mission, NASA's planet-hunting Kepler spacecraft had a unique opportunity to provide a "big picture" view of the comet as it was unobservable from Earth. Ground-based telescopes could not see comet 67P, because the comet's orbit placed it in the sky during daylight hours.

From Sept. 7 through Sept. 20, the Kepler spacecraft, operating in its K2 mission, fixed its gaze on comet 67P. From the distant vantage point of Kepler, the spacecraft could observe the comet's core and tail. The long-range global view of Kepler complements the close-in view of the Rosetta spacecraft, providing context for the high-resolution investigation Rosetta performed as it descended closer and closer to the comet.

During the two-week period of study, Kepler took a picture of the comet every 30 minutes. The animation shows a period of 29.5 hours of observation from Sept. 17 through Sept. 18. The comet is seen passing through Kepler's field of view from top right to bottom left, as outlined by the diagonal strip. The white dots represent stars and other regions in space studied during K2's tenth observing campaign.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6641

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6318
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
The Many Faces of Rosetta's Comet 67P
« Reply #129 on: Mar 24, 2017, 10:04:08 »
The Many Faces of Rosetta's Comet 67P

Images returned from the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission indicate that during its most recent trip through the inner solar system, the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was a very active place - full of growing fractures, collapsing cliffs and massive rolling boulders. Moving material buried some features on the comet's surface while exhuming others. A study on 67P's changing surface was released Tuesday, March 21, in the journal Science.

"As comets approach the sun, they go into overdrive and exhibit spectacular changes on their surface," said Ramy El-Maarry, study leader and a member of the U.S. Rosetta science team from the University of Colorado, Boulder. "This is something we were not able to really appreciate before the Rosetta mission, which gave us the chance to look at a comet in ultra-high resolution for more than two years."

More: https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6786