Author Topic: News of the Comet-hunting Rosetta mission  (Read 10274 times)

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Rick

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News of the Comet-hunting Rosetta mission
« on: Jan 29, 2007, 12:46:22 »
Comet-hunting Rosetta films distant asteroid

The comet-hunting spacecraft Rosetta has sent back its first sighting of the asteroid 21-Lutetia, one of two rocky bodies it will study en route to the comet 67p Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It will not get anywhere close to the rock for more than two years, but has already begun sending back preliminary data.

Once the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS) mounted onboard the Rosetta orbiter was up and running, it began tracking the asteroid. Along with its planned observations of asteroid 2867-Steins, this early study of the 100km-wide Lutetia will help the mission in a number of ways.

More: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/01/29/rosetta_pictures/
« Last Edit: Oct 14, 2013, 09:46:11 by Rick »

Rick

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Re: Comet-hunting Rosetta films distant asteroid
« Reply #1 on: Feb 26, 2007, 13:44:56 »
25 February 2007
At 03:57 CET today, mission controllers at ESOC, ESA's Space Operations Centre in Germany, confirmed Rosetta's successful swingby of Mars, a key milestone in the 7.1-thousand-million km journey of this unique spacecraft to its target comet in 2014.
 
The gravitational energy of Mars helped Rosetta change direction, while the spacecraft was decelerated with respect to the Sun by an estimated 7887 km/hour. The spacecraft is now on the correct track towards Earth - its next destination planet whose gravitational energy Rosetta will exploit in November this year to gain acceleration and continue on its trek.

More: http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMWZ5CE8YE_index_0.html

(and thanks to Diane Duane's blog for the link...)

Rick

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Re: Comet-hunting Rosetta films distant asteroid
« Reply #2 on: Feb 26, 2007, 18:01:54 »
Comet-chasing spacecraft Rosetta has sent back pictures of its closest approach to Mars after it completed its flyby of the planet this weekend. The stunning pictures are the first taken by the Philae lander's instruments operating independently of the main craft.

More: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/02/26/mars_rosetta/

Rick

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Re: Comet-hunting Rosetta films distant asteroid
« Reply #3 on: Feb 26, 2007, 18:02:48 »
A series of beautiful images taken by Rosetta’s Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System (OSIRIS), shows planet Mars in the pre-close-approach phase.

See them here: http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMUDT70LYE_index_0.html

Rick

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Deadly planet-smash asteroid was actually Euro probe
« Reply #4 on: Nov 13, 2007, 16:14:13 »
Deadly planet-smash asteroid was actually Euro probe

Asteroid-apocalypse experts were struck by a shower of eggs last week, as they prepared to sound the alarm over an incoming space boulder potentially capable of wiping out life on Earth - only to find that the object was a well-known European space probe (Rosetta) on a planned flyby.

The Minor Planet Centre (MPC) - which is to asteroids what the Cheyenne Mountain command bunker was to Russian missiles - raised the alarm last week. The MPC passed the word among astronomers that a deadly celestial object, designated 2007 VN84, would pass within 5,600km of Earth, and asked for tracking information.

More: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/11/13/rosetta_asteroid_spacecraft_patrick_moore_cockup/

It's not 1st April yet... ;)
« Last Edit: Oct 14, 2013, 09:42:38 by Rick »

Mike

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Deadly planet-smash asteroid was actually Euro probe
« Reply #5 on: Nov 13, 2007, 16:57:59 »
No comment !!   :roll:
We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology. Carl Sagan

Rick

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Comet chaser makes Earth swing-by
« Reply #6 on: Nov 14, 2007, 18:09:13 »
Comet chaser makes Earth swing-by

A European space probe has swung by the Earth to gather energy to chase down and land on a distant comet.

The unmanned Rosetta craft made its closest approach to the planet at 20:57 GMT on Tuesday at a distance of 5,301km above the Pacific Ocean.

The spacecraft was using the Earth's gravity to give it the boost it needs to reach its final destination in 2014.

More: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7093402.stm
« Last Edit: Oct 14, 2013, 09:44:54 by Rick »

Carole

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Deadly planet-smash asteroid was actually Euro probe
« Reply #7 on: Nov 15, 2007, 00:15:08 »
This was the probe that we had a talk about at one of our meetings.  Nice to know where it has got to, but how can these professionals not know what crafts are up there at a given time!!!!

Carole

Rick

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Deadly planet-smash asteroid was actually Euro probe
« Reply #8 on: Nov 15, 2007, 08:07:49 »
I think the asteroid-collision folks just got a bit over-excited when they worked out how close it was coming, and forgot to check. ;)

Rick

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Rosetta spies nightlife on our sleeping planet
« Reply #9 on: Nov 16, 2007, 15:23:17 »
Rosetta spies nightlife on our sleeping planet

What better way to start a Friday than with a stupendously glorious picture of our planet? Well, we couldn't think of many better ways that are legal, so we've gone for the picture option.

Go see the pics: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/11/16/night_time_earth/
« Last Edit: Oct 14, 2013, 09:40:10 by Rick »

MarkS

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Rosetta spies nightlife on our sleeping planet
« Reply #10 on: Nov 16, 2007, 18:32:40 »

A stupendously glorious picture of our planet? 
Look at all that lovely light pollution.  :(

Rick

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Rosetta spies nightlife on our sleeping planet
« Reply #11 on: Nov 17, 2007, 09:11:35 »
Yeah. That's what I thought, too... Still, it's another eye-catching illustration of the problem. Interesting how much worse the northern hemisphere is. :/

Rick

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Re: Comet-hunting Rosetta films distant asteroid
« Reply #12 on: Sep 08, 2008, 00:17:17 »
The Rosetta space probe has made a close pass of asteroid Steins.

The European Space Agency mission flew past the 5km-wide rock at a distance of about 800km, taking pictures and recording other scientific data.

The information was sent back to Earth for processing late on Friday and released to the public on Saturday.

More: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7599962.stm

Rick

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Re: Comet-hunting Rosetta films distant asteroid
« Reply #13 on: Sep 08, 2008, 10:50:34 »

Rick

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Re: Comet-hunting Rosetta films distant asteroid
« Reply #14 on: Sep 09, 2008, 15:07:39 »