Author Topic: NASA Juno mission to Jupiter  (Read 3471 times)

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Rick

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NASA Juno mission to Jupiter
« on: Nov 25, 2008, 17:05:04 »
NASA has confirmed a 2011 launch date for its Jupiter-bound Juno spacecraft, equipped to probe the planet's "formation, evolution and structure".

Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator from the Southwest Research Institute, explained: "Jupiter is the archetype of giant planets in our solar system and formed very early, capturing most of the material left after the sun formed. Unlike Earth, Jupiter's giant mass allowed it to hold onto its original composition, providing us with a way of tracing our solar system's history."

More: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/11/25/juno_launch/

Rick

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Juno mission to Jupiter
« Reply #1 on: Aug 05, 2011, 17:33:02 »
Juno Ready to Launch to Jupiter

The Juno spacecraft will soon be on its way to Jupiter on a mission to look deep beneath the planet's swirling curtain of clouds to find out what lies beneath. The answer might confirm theories about how the solar system formed, or it may change everything we thought we knew.

"The special thing about Juno is we're really looking at one of the first steps, the earliest time in our solar system's history," said Scott Bolton, the principal investigator for the Juno mission. "Right after the sun formed, what happened that allowed the planets to form and why are the planets a slightly different composition than the sun?"

Starting the 4-ton spacecraft on its five-year journey to the largest planet in the solar system is the job of a United Launch Alliance Atlas V equipped with five solid-fueled boosters. Even with that much power, Juno will still require a flyby of Earth to get up enough energy to swing out to Jupiter.

More: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/launch/Juno_launchpreview.html

Juno Jupiter Mission to Carry Plaque Dedicated to Galileo

A plaque dedicated to the famous astronomer Galileo Galilei will be carried to Jupiter aboard NASA's Juno spacecraft. The launch period for Juno opens Aug. 5, 2011, and extends through Aug. 26. For an Aug. 5 liftoff, the launch window opens at 8:34 a.m. PDT (11:34 a.m. EDT) and remains open through 9:43 a.m. PDT (12:43 p.m. EDT).

Among his many achievements, Galileo Galilei discovered that moons orbited Jupiter in 1610. These satellites -- Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto -- are also known as the Galilean moons.

More: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/news/galileo20110803.html

Juno Spacecraft to Carry Three Figurines to Jupiter Orbit

NASA's Jupiter-bound Juno spacecraft will carry the 1.5-inch likeness of Galileo Galilei, the Roman god Jupiter and his wife Juno to Jupiter when the spacecraft launches this Friday, Aug. 5. The inclusion of the three mini-statues, or figurines, is part of a joint outreach and educational program developed as part of the partnership between NASA and the LEGO Group to inspire children to explore science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

More: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/news/lego20110803.html
« Last Edit: Aug 05, 2011, 17:41:28 by Rick »

Rick

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Re: Juno mission to Jupiter
« Reply #2 on: Aug 05, 2011, 17:34:40 »
Juno Lifts Off

NASA's Juno spacecraft, headed to Jupiter, has lifted off from Cape Canaveral, Fla. aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket.

On Friday, Aug. 5, the launch window for NASA's Jupiter-bound Juno mission opens at 8:34 a.m. PDT (11:34 a.m. EDT) and extends through 9:43 a.m. PDT (12:43 p.m. EDT) at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The satellite observatory is nestled inside the top of a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 551 rocket, the most powerful Atlas rocket in NASA's inventory.

More: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/news/juno20110804.html

Main mission page: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/main/index.html

Rick

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Re: Juno mission to Jupiter
« Reply #3 on: Aug 09, 2011, 09:43:21 »
...and today's APOD is a video of the launch: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap110809.html

Carole

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Re: Juno mission to Jupiter
« Reply #4 on: Aug 11, 2011, 15:45:39 »
I love the camera mounted on the spacecraft looking back at Earth.

Carole

Rick

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Jupiter-Bound Space Probe Captures Earth And Moon
« Reply #5 on: Aug 31, 2011, 12:52:12 »
Jupiter-Bound Space Probe Captures Earth And Moon

On its way to the biggest planet in the solar system -- Jupiter, NASA's Juno spacecraft took time to capture its home planet and its natural satellite -- the Moon.

The image was taken by the spacecraft's camera, JunoCam, on Aug. 26 when the spacecraft was about 6 million miles (9.66 million kilometers) away. The image was taken as part of the mission team's checkout of the Juno spacecraft. The team is conducting its initial detailed checks on the spacecraft's instruments and subsystems after its launch on Aug. 5.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-271

mickw

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Re: Juno mission to Jupiter
« Reply #6 on: Aug 31, 2011, 13:00:06 »
It's quite amazing that it's averaging 2 million miles a week  :o
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Mac

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Re: Juno mission to Jupiter
« Reply #7 on: Aug 31, 2011, 15:57:28 »
but whats its MPG?
Never, ever, argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.
If you argue with an idiot, there are two idiots.

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Re: Juno mission to Jupiter
« Reply #8 on: Aug 31, 2011, 18:40:58 »
 :lol: :lol:
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Rick

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NASA's Juno is Halfway to Jupiter
« Reply #9 on: Aug 13, 2013, 09:18:33 »
NASA's Juno is Halfway to Jupiter

NASA's Juno spacecraft is halfway to Jupiter. The Jovian-system-bound spacecraft reached the milestone today (8/12/13) at 5:25 a.m. PDT (8:25 a.m. EDT/12:25 UTC).

"Juno's odometer just clicked over to 9.464 astronomical units," said Juno Principal Investigator Scott Bolton, of the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "The team is looking forward, preparing for the day we enter orbit around the most massive planet in our solar system."

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-246

Rick

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[BAA-ebulletin 00765] Juno flyby tonight
« Reply #10 on: Oct 08, 2013, 23:24:36 »
[BAA-ebulletin 00765] Juno flyby tonight
(c) 2013 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

Juno flyby tonight

The Juno spacecraft, en route to Jupiter, will be performing a slingshot flyby of Earth tonight, Oct.9/10, and will be well positioned for observation from Europe on its outbound trajectory.  Juno passes closest approach in shadow at an altitude of only 558  km over the southern tip of Africa at 19:21 UT, then it leaves eclipse at 19:39 UT, and will be in view from Europe and Asia as it departs.  It will be faint and rapidly moving, fading from possibly mag.10 around 20h UT to  mag.>13 after midnight as it recedes.  However, expert observers may be able to locate it.  Go to Heavens Above ( http://www.heavens-above.com/ ) for customized predictions, or to JPL HORIZONS ( http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/?horizons ) for an ephemeris.

Preston Dyches of the Juno outreach team says:  "We are interested in receiving any images or video to potentially share via Juno's web and social media (when the US gov't shutdown ends, of course)."  Folks may email images to juno_outreach at jpl.nasa.gov.

John H. Rogers, Ph.D.
Jupiter Section Director,
British Astronomical Association.
http://www.britastro.org/jupiter

Rick

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Re: [BAA-ebulletin 00765] Juno flyby tonight
« Reply #11 on: Oct 08, 2013, 23:26:09 »
There's another take on the close approach at http://missionjuno.swri.edu/hijuno/ ...

Rick

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Juno spacecraft resumes full flight operations on its way to Jupiter

NASA’s Juno spacecraft, which is on its way to Jupiter, resumed full flight operations earlier today. The spacecraft had entered safe mode during its flyby of Earth last Wednesday. The safe mode did not impact the spacecraft's trajectory one smidgeon. This flyby provided the necessary gravity boost to accurately slingshot the probe towards Jupiter, where it will arrive on July 4, 2016.

The spacecraft exited safe mode at 4:12 p.m. CDT (5:12 p.m. EDT) earlier today. The spacecraft is currently operating nominally and all systems are fully functional.

On Oct. 9, Juno past within 350 miles of the ocean just off the tip of South Africa at 3:21 p.m. EDT (12:21 PDT / 19:21 UTC). Soon after closest approach, a signal was received by the European Space Agency's 15-meter antenna just north of Perth, Australia, indicating the spacecraft initiated an automated fault-protection action called "safe mode."

More: http://www.swri.org/9what/releases/2013/junocraft.htm

Rick

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NASA's Juno Gives Starship-Like View of Earth Flyby
« Reply #13 on: Dec 11, 2013, 09:03:30 »
NASA's Juno Gives Starship-Like View of Earth Flyby

When NASA's Juno spacecraft flew past Earth on Oct. 9, 2013, it received a boost in speed of more than 8,800 mph (about 7.3 kilometer per second), which set it on course for a July 4, 2016, rendezvous with Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system. One of Juno's sensors, a special kind of camera optimized to track faint stars, also had a unique view of the Earth-moon system. The result was an intriguing, low-resolution glimpse of what our world would look like to a visitor from afar.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-360

Rick

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With One Year to Jupiter, NASA's Juno Team Prepares
« Reply #14 on: Jul 08, 2015, 07:49:58 »
With One Year to Jupiter, NASA's Juno Team Prepares

With just one year remaining in a five-year trek to Jupiter, the team of NASA's Juno mission is hard at work preparing for the spacecraft's expedition to the solar system's largest planet. The mission aims to reveal the story of Jupiter's formation and details of its interior structure. Data from Juno will provide insights about our solar system's beginnings, and what we learn from the mission will also enrich scientists' understanding of giant planets around other stars.

Juno is scheduled to arrive at Jupiter on July 4, 2016 (Pacific Daylight Time). Once it settles into orbit, the spacecraft will brave the hazards of Jupiter's intense radiation when it repeatedly approaches within a few thousand miles, or kilometers, of the cloud tops to collect its data.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4648

Rick

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Hubble Maps Show Jupiter Changes and Prepare for Juno
« Reply #15 on: Oct 17, 2015, 08:45:43 »
Hubble Maps Show Jupiter Changes and Prepare for Juno

New maps of Jupiter, produced using images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, provide a detailed window on the giant planet's dynamic features. The views come as the agency prepares for its Juno mission to arrive at Jupiter in a little less than a year.

The maps are the first in a planned series of yearly portraits of the solar system's four giant, outer planets, and are intended help scientists monitor how these worlds change over time.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4739

Rick

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To Jupiter with JunoCam!
« Reply #16 on: Dec 07, 2015, 08:49:00 »
To Jupiter with JunoCam!

When NASA's Juno mission arrives at Jupiter on July 4, 2016, new views of the giant planet's swirling clouds will be sent back to Earth, courtesy of its color camera, called JunoCam. But unlike previous space missions, professional scientists will not be the ones producing the processed views, or even choosing which images to capture. Instead, the public will act as a virtual imaging team, participating in key steps of the process, from identifying features of interest to sharing the finished images online.

"This is really the public's camera. We are hoping students and whole classrooms will get involved and join our team," said Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4783

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NASA's Juno Spacecraft Crosses Jupiter/Sun Gravitational Boundary
« Reply #17 on: May 28, 2016, 09:39:48 »
NASA's Juno Spacecraft Crosses Jupiter/Sun Gravitational Boundary

Since its launch five years ago, there have been three forces tugging at NASA's Juno spacecraft as it speeds through the solar system. The sun, Earth and Jupiter have all been influential -- a gravitational trifecta of sorts. At times, Earth was close enough to be the frontrunner. More recently, the sun has had the most clout when it comes to Juno's trajectory. Today, it can be reported that Jupiter is now in the gravitational driver's seat, and the basketball court-sized spacecraft is not looking back.

"Today the gravitational influence of Jupiter is neck and neck with that of the sun," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "As of tomorrow, and for the rest of the mission, we project Jupiter's gravity will dominate as the trajectory-perturbing effects by other celestial bodies are reduced to insignificant roles."

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6520

Rick

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NASA's Juno Mission 25 Days from Jupiter
« Reply #18 on: Jun 19, 2016, 21:24:46 »
NASA's Juno Mission 25 Days from Jupiter

NASA's Juno mission is now 25 days and 11.1 million miles (17.8 million kilometers) away from the largest planetary inhabitant in our solar system -- Jupiter. On the evening of July 4, Juno will fire its main engine for 35 minutes, placing it into a polar orbit around the gas giant. It will be a daring planetary encounter: Giant Jupiter lies in the harshest radiation environment known, and Juno has been specially designed to safely navigate the brand new territory.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6528

Rick

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NASA's Juno Spacecraft to Risk Jupiter's Fireworks for Science
« Reply #19 on: Jun 19, 2016, 21:28:13 »
NASA's Juno Spacecraft to Risk Jupiter's Fireworks for Science

On July 4, NASA will fly a solar-powered spacecraft the size of a basketball court within 2,900 miles (4,667 kilometers) of the cloud tops of our solar system's largest planet.

As of Thursday, Juno is 18 days and 8.6 million miles (13.8 million kilometers) from Jupiter. On the evening of July 4, Juno will fire its main engine for 35 minutes, placing it into a polar orbit around the gas giant. During the flybys, Juno will probe beneath the obscuring cloud cover of Jupiter and study its auroras to learn more about the planet's origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6538

Rick

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NASA's Juno Spacecraft Closing in on Jupiter
« Reply #20 on: Jun 28, 2016, 08:55:05 »
NASA's Juno Spacecraft Closing in on Jupiter

Today (6/24), at exactly 9:57 and 48 seconds a.m. PDT, NASA's Juno spacecraft was 5.5 million miles (8.9 million kilometers) from its July 4th appointment with Jupiter. Over the past two weeks, several milestones occurred that were key to a successful 35-minute burn of its rocket motor, which will place the robotic explorer into a polar orbit around the gas giant.

"We have over five years of spaceflight experience and only 10 days to Jupiter orbit insertion," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "It is a great feeling to put all the interplanetary space in the rearview mirror and have the biggest planet in the solar system in our windshield."

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6543

Rick

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Juno Spacecraft in Safe Mode for Latest Jupiter Flyby
« Reply #21 on: Oct 22, 2016, 11:40:13 »
Juno Spacecraft in Safe Mode for Latest Jupiter Flyby
Scientists Intrigued by Data from First Flyby


NASA's Juno spacecraft entered safe mode Tuesday, Oct. 18 at about 10:47 p.m. PDT (Oct. 19 at 1:47 a.m. EDT). Early indications are a software performance monitor induced a reboot of the spacecraft's onboard computer. The spacecraft acted as expected during the transition into safe mode, restarted successfully and is healthy. High-rate data has been restored, and the spacecraft is conducting flight software diagnostics. All instruments are off, and the planned science data collection for today's close flyby of Jupiter (perijove 2), did not occur.

"At the time safe mode was entered, the spacecraft was more than 13 hours from its closest approach to Jupiter," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "We were still quite a ways from the planet's more intense radiation belts and magnetic fields. The spacecraft is healthy and we are working our standard recovery procedure."

The spacecraft is designed to enter safe mode if its onboard computer perceives conditions are not as expected. In this case, the safe mode turned off instruments and a few non-critical spacecraft components, and it confirmed the spacecraft was pointed toward the sun to ensure the solar arrays received power.

Mission managers are continuing to study an unrelated issue with the performance of a pair of valves that are part of the spacecraft's propulsion system. Last week the decision was made to postpone a burn of the spacecraft's main engine that would have reduced Juno's orbital period from 53.4 to 14 days.

The next close flyby is scheduled on Dec. 11, with all science instruments on.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6653

Rick

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NASA's Juno Mission Exits Safe Mode, Performs Trim Maneuver
« Reply #22 on: Oct 27, 2016, 08:26:00 »
NASA's Juno Mission Exits Safe Mode, Performs Trim Maneuver

NASA's Juno spacecraft at Jupiter has left safe mode and has successfully completed a minor burn of its thruster engines in preparation for its next close flyby of Jupiter.

Mission controllers commanded Juno to exit safe mode Monday, Oct. 24, with confirmation of safe mode exit received on the ground at 10:05 a.m. PDT (1:05 p.m. EDT). The spacecraft entered safe mode on Oct. 18 when a software performance monitor induced a reboot of the spacecraft's onboard computer. The team is still investigating the cause of the reboot and assessing two main engine check valves.

"Juno exited safe mode as expected, is healthy and is responding to all our commands," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "We anticipate we will be turning on the instruments in early November to get ready for our December flyby."

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6661

Rick

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NASA Juno Mission Completes Latest Jupiter Flyby
« Reply #23 on: Dec 20, 2016, 08:47:09 »
NASA Juno Mission Completes Latest Jupiter Flyby

NASA's Juno mission completed a close flyby of Jupiter on Sunday, Dec. 11, its latest science orbit of the mission.

Seven instruments and the spacecraft's JunoCam were operating during the flyby to collect data that is now being returned to Earth. Juno is currently in a 53-day orbit, and its next close flyby of Jupiter will occur on Feb. 2, 2017.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6695

Rick

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Juno Captures Jupiter 'Pearl'
« Reply #24 on: Dec 20, 2016, 08:59:30 »
Juno Captures Jupiter 'Pearl'

Take a look: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6702

Apophis

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Re: NASA Juno mission to Jupiter
« Reply #25 on: Dec 20, 2016, 21:08:52 »
"JunoCam is a color, visible-light camera ......"

So thats the actual colour of Jupiter then....what about previous more colourful astro images?
Roger
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Rick

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It's Never 'Groundhog Day' at Jupiter (Juno)
« Reply #26 on: Feb 17, 2017, 09:38:39 »
It's Never 'Groundhog Day' at Jupiter (Juno)

NASA's Juno mission completed a close flyby of Jupiter on Thursday, Feb. 2, its latest science orbit of the mission.

All of Juno's science instruments and the spacecraft's JunoCam were operating during the flyby to collect data that is now being returned to Earth. Juno is currently in a 53-day orbit, and its next close flyby of Jupiter will occur on March 27, 2017.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6733

Rick

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NASA's Juno to Remain in Current Orbit at Jupiter
« Reply #27 on: Feb 19, 2017, 22:18:56 »
NASA's Juno to Remain in Current Orbit at Jupiter

NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter, which has been in orbit around the gas giant since July 4, 2016, will remain in its current 53-day orbit for the remainder of the mission. This will allow Juno to accomplish its science goals, while avoiding the risk of a previously-planned engine firing that would have reduced the spacecraft's orbital period to 14 days.

"Juno is healthy, its science instruments are fully operational, and the data and images we've received are nothing short of amazing," said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. "The decision to forego the burn is the right thing to do -- preserving a valuable asset so that Juno can continue its exciting journey of discovery."

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6752

Rick

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Juno Spacecraft Completes Fifth Jupiter Flyby
« Reply #28 on: Apr 05, 2017, 10:19:57 »
Juno Spacecraft Completes Fifth Jupiter Flyby

NASA's Juno mission accomplished a close flyby of Jupiter on Monday, March 27, successfully completing its fourth science orbit.

All of Juno's science instruments and the spacecraft's JunoCam were operating during the flyby, collecting data that is now being returned to Earth. Juno's next close flyby of Jupiter will occur on May 19, 2017.

More: https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6792

Carole

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Close up on the GRS from Juno
« Reply #29 on: Jul 13, 2017, 08:16:16 »
Images of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot reveal a tangle of dark, veinous clouds weaving their way through a massive crimson oval. The JunoCam imager aboard NASA's Juno mission snapped pics of the most iconic feature of the solar system’s largest planetary inhabitant during its Monday (July 10) flyby. The images of the Great Red Spot were downlinked from the spacecraft’s memory on Tuesday and placed on the mission’s JunoCam website Wednesday morning.



https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/nasa-s-juno-spacecraft-spots-jupiter-s-great-red-spot

Rick

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Jupiter's Auroras Present a Powerful Mystery
« Reply #30 on: Sep 08, 2017, 09:28:02 »
Jupiter's Auroras Present a Powerful Mystery

Scientists on NASA's Juno mission have observed massive amounts of energy swirling over Jupiter's polar regions that contribute to the giant planet's powerful auroras - only not in ways the researchers expected.

Examining data collected by the ultraviolet spectrograph and energetic-particle detector instruments aboard the Jupiter-orbiting Juno spacecraft, a team led by Barry Mauk of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, observed signatures of powerful electric potentials, aligned with Jupiter's magnetic field, that accelerate electrons toward the Jovian atmosphere at energies up to 400,000 electron volts. This is 10 to 30 times higher than the largest auroral potentials observed at Earth, where only several thousands of volts are typically needed to generate the most intense auroras -- known as discrete auroras -- the dazzling, twisting, snake-like northern and southern lights seen in places like Alaska and Canada, northern Europe, and many other northern and southern polar regions.

More: https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6940