Author Topic: News of the Voyager missions - in flight since 1977  (Read 4820 times)

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Rick

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'Tsunami Wave' Still Flies Through Interstellar Space
« Reply #15 on: Dec 17, 2014, 05:10:04 »
'Tsunami Wave' Still Flies Through Interstellar Space

• The Voyager 1 spacecraft has experienced three shock waves

• The most recent shock wave, first observed in February 2014, still appears to be going on

• One wave, previously reported, helped researchers determine that Voyager 1 had entered interstellar space

The "tsunami wave" that NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft began experiencing earlier this year is still propagating outward, according to new results. It is the longest-lasting shock wave that researchers have seen in interstellar space.

"Most people would have thought the interstellar medium would have been smooth and quiet. But these shock waves seem to be more common than we thought," said Don Gurnett, professor of physics at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Gurnett presented the new data Monday, Dec. 15 at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4411

Rick

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'Pale Blue Dot' Images Turn 25
« Reply #16 on: Feb 14, 2015, 09:28:52 »
'Pale Blue Dot' Images Turn 25

Valentine's Day is special for NASA's Voyager mission. It was on Feb. 14, 1990, that the Voyager 1 spacecraft looked back at our solar system and snapped the first-ever pictures of the planets from its perch at that time beyond Neptune.

This "family portrait" captures Neptune, Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter, Earth and Venus from Voyager 1's unique vantage point. A few key members did not make it in: Mars had little sunlight, Mercury was too close to the sun, and dwarf planet Pluto turned out too dim.

Taking these images was not part of the original plan, but the late Carl Sagan, a member of the Voyager imaging team at the time, had the idea of pointing the spacecraft back toward its home for a last look. The title of his 1994 book, "Pale Blue Dot," refers to the image of Earth in this series.

"Twenty-five years ago, Voyager 1 looked back toward Earth and saw a 'pale blue dot,' " an image that continues to inspire wonderment about the spot we call home," said Ed Stone, project scientist for the Voyager mission, based at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4484

Rick

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NASA's last original Voyager engineer is retiring
« Reply #17 on: Oct 31, 2015, 10:12:24 »
NASA's last original Voyager engineer is retiring

Imagine if you were working on a 40-year-old computer at your office. Your IT department wouldn't even know what to do with it.

That's the problem NASA's Voyager mission faces. The spacecraft was built in 1975 and has a computer from the Atari age. The last guy who truly understands how to program it is 80-year-old NASA engineer Larry Zottarelli.

And he's retiring.

More: http://money.cnn.com/2015/10/27/technology/voyager-nasa/

Rick

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Voyager 1 Helps Solve Interstellar Medium Mystery
« Reply #18 on: Nov 02, 2015, 09:47:39 »
Voyager 1 Helps Solve Interstellar Medium Mystery

NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft made history in 2012 by entering interstellar space, leaving the planets and the solar wind behind. But observations from the pioneering probe were puzzling with regard to the magnetic field around it, as they differed from what scientists derived from observations by other spacecraft.

A new study offers fresh insights into this mystery. Writing in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, Nathan Schwadron of the University of New Hampshire, Durham, and colleagues reanalyzed magnetic field data from Voyager 1 and found that the direction of the magnetic field has been slowly turning ever since the spacecraft crossed into interstellar space. They believe this is an effect of the nearby boundary of the solar wind, a stream of charged particles that comes from the sun.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4756

Rick

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Voyager 2's first readings from beyond Solar System
« Reply #19 on: Nov 05, 2019, 09:54:29 »
Boffins hand in their homework on Voyager 2's first readings from beyond Solar System

NASA's Voyager 2, launched to study the Solar System's outer planets, has had its first readings from interstellar space, collected after travelling more than 11 billion miles over forty years, analyzed by scientists.

It is only the second probe to have sailed beyond the heliosphere – the expansive region made of plasma and magnetic fields generated by the Sun. It finally broke free from the Solar System to enter interstellar space last year, joining its twin companion Voyager 1, which exited in 2012.

More: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/11/05/voyager_2_phone_home/

Hugh

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Re: News of the Voyager missions - in flight since 1977
« Reply #20 on: Nov 05, 2019, 10:19:39 »
Thanks Rick for keeping us updated.  Was reading something on digital media yesterday about the voyager(s). 

Such interesting cosmology!

Best

Hugh