Author Topic: Nova in Cassiopeia  (Read 155 times)

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Rick

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Nova in Cassiopeia
« on: Mar 19, 2021, 17:41:34 »
Nova in Cassiopeia

A nova has appeared in the constellation of Cassiopeia. Novae are stars that suddenly undergo an increase in brightness of typically over a thousand-fold, so what looks like a new star appears. In this case, the nova is 8th magnitude, which is visible using binoculars.

The object was discovered on 18 March by Japanese amateur astronomer Yuji Nakamura, who reported it to Japan’s national observatory. It has been confirmed as a nova on the basis of its spectrum. The nova is at

RA 23h 24m 47.60s, Dec +61º 11' 14.0" (Epoch 2000.0)

More: https://www.popastro.com/main_spa1/blog/2021/03/19/nova-in-cassiopeia/

(Hat-tips to Hugh Alford and Andrew Ramsey)

Hugh

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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia
« Reply #1 on: Mar 20, 2021, 11:52:36 »
Perhaps a challenge for an astrophotographer?

 :lol:

Hugh


Rick

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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia
« Reply #2 on: Mar 20, 2021, 13:07:59 »
It's circumpolar, and bright enough that it should be visible even with binoculars from a reasonably dark site. Just a matter of waiting for a clear sky...

The discovery "telegram" is here: http://www.astronomerstelegram.org/?read=14471

It's also worth reading the folow-up telegrams linked from that one. Apparently its spectrum has changed quite dramatically over just a couple of days.

Roy

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Re: Nova in Cassiopeia
« Reply #3 on: Mar 21, 2021, 10:41:01 »
Reckon I just about saw it using binoculars with averted vision from our back garden, and whilst its location being very easy to find, the light pollution from Sainsbury's didn't help.

Roy