Author Topic: NASA’s SOFIA Discovers Water on Sunlit Surface of Moon  (Read 49 times)

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Rick

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NASA’s SOFIA Discovers Water on Sunlit Surface of Moon

SOFIA has detected water molecules (H2O) in Clavius Crater, one of the largest craters visible from Earth, located in the Moon’s southern hemisphere. Previous observations of the Moon’s surface detected some form of hydrogen, but were unable to distinguish between water and its close chemical relative, hydroxyl (OH). Data from this location reveal water in concentrations of 100 to 412 parts per million – roughly equivalent to a 12-ounce bottle of water – trapped in a cubic meter of soil spread across the lunar surface. The results are published in the latest issue of Nature Astronomy.

More: https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-s-sofia-discovers-water-on-sunlit-surface-of-moon/

Rick

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Re: NASA’s SOFIA Discovers Water on Sunlit Surface of Moon
« Reply #1 on: Oct 26, 2020, 21:41:49 »
Did Arthur C. Clarke call it right? Water spotted in Moon's sunlit Clavius Crater by NASA telescope

Water molecules have been detected in soil in one of the Moon's largest sunlit craters, NASA announced on Monday, which means permanent bases on the natural satellite may be potentially a lot easier to support.

The discovery was made using a telescope onboard NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) – a modified Boeing 747 capable of flying 45,000 feet above our planet. The airborne 'scope spied what may well be water in the Clavius Crater, which is visible from Earth, located in the southern hemisphere, and, coincidentally, the site of mankind's first Moon base in Arthur C. Clarke's classic science fiction novel 2001.

More: https://www.theregister.com/2020/10/26/nasa_moon_water/