Author Topic: "@$*? Starlink  (Read 107 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Carole

  • O. A. S.
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 8413
    • Carole's images
"@$*? Starlink
« on: Mar 20, 2020, 22:25:05 »
This is not my image, but just look what some-one posted on astrobin casued by the Starlink satelittes.


Apophis

  • O. A. S.
  • Cluster Class
  • *
  • Posts: 1129
  • Solar , Deepsky
Re: "@$*? Starlink
« Reply #1 on: Mar 20, 2020, 23:08:57 »
Where abouts in the world was this as according to the starlink reporting site none are viewable from here at Cairds at the moment?
Roger

Carole

  • O. A. S.
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 8413
    • Carole's images
Re: "@$*? Starlink
« Reply #2 on: Mar 21, 2020, 09:01:11 »
Switzerland apparently.

But I was showing more for a view of the future as more and more are installed.

Carole

The Thing

  • Mr October
  • O. A. S.
  • Galaxy Class
  • *
  • Posts: 2856
  • The OAS International Branch
    • AstroManche
Re: "@$*? Starlink
« Reply #3 on: Mar 21, 2020, 09:53:11 »
That looks like M106, if so I imaged there the other night and caught very few satellites...
We're all guinea pigs in the laboratory of life. Better a fluffy guinea pig than a lab rat!
¯\_(ツ)_/¯ (Gallic shrug :))

Rick

  • Administrator
  • Galaxy Cluster
  • *
  • Posts: 6473
    • http://www.orpington-astronomy.org.uk
Re: "@$*? Starlink
« Reply #4 on: Mar 21, 2020, 10:36:23 »
It's all about the time of night, and how far below the horizon the Sun is. These satellites are in low Earth orbit, so they will be in eclipse for some of the night, at least in winter. As we come into summer and the length of full night is short, they'll be more bothersome.

I guess one trick to avoiding them more easily would be to go imaging somewhere close to the equator where twilight is short...