Author Topic: Observing Tonight  (Read 578 times)

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Roy

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Observing Tonight
« on: Jul 19, 2016, 00:33:03 »
For the first time in ages I've just had evenings observing (no imaging); saw the Blue Snowball Nebula (NGC7662) which I've never seen before, along with many of the usual Messier objects. Also I tried out my new Berlebach tripod under the HEQ5, and what a difference - the whole setup was so much more rigid and stable.
Roy

MarkS

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Re: Observing Tonight
« Reply #1 on: Jul 19, 2016, 05:56:18 »
For the first time in ages I've just had evenings observing (no imaging); saw the Blue Snowball Nebula (NGC7662) which I've never seen before, along with many of the usual Messier objects. Also I tried out my new Berlebach tripod under the HEQ5, and what a difference - the whole setup was so much more rigid and stable.
Roy

Excellent.  Just wait for a night without a full moon!

What makes the Berlebach tripod so much better?  Would it be a good choice for imaging?

Mark

doug

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Re: Observing Tonight
« Reply #2 on: Jul 19, 2016, 09:42:25 »
Well done Roy. It is really great to actually see objects with your own eye, rather than on a computer screen. It`s a magic thing... That`s why I like looking....


Doug
Always look on the bright side of life ...

Mike

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Re: Observing Tonight
« Reply #3 on: Jul 19, 2016, 09:49:07 »
I always wanted one of those Berlebach tripods too. They look really nice and are meant to dampen vibrations much better than the metal tripod.

I remember seeing the Blue Snowball visually through Paul's 14" dobsonian many years ago. Interesting object.
We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology. Carl Sagan

Roy

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Re: Observing Tonight
« Reply #4 on: Jul 19, 2016, 12:24:34 »
Mark,
Based on just on last nights experience as well as talking to others especially Jim, I would say that the advantages of the Berlebach (Uni-18 in our case) over the standard Skywatcher tripod with 1.75" tubular steel legs, are:
1. the greater mass reduces the inverted pendulum effect one gets when putting a large mass on a lightweight tripod (though not so good for portability);
2. the legs are made of ash which has excellent damping properties;
3. when one tightens the spreader on a Skywatcher tripod, it splays the legs which can in turn upset levelling on uneven surfaces, this does not happen with the design of the Berlebach;
4. increased rigidity, as one can tighten everything up much better including locking the leg positions;
5. dare I say it, the Berlebach looks drop dead gorgeous and oozes quality.
In summary I would say that it would be a significant improvement over SW tripods for imaging where one does not have a permanent installation, for us that's all the time.
Roy

Fay

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Re: Observing Tonight
« Reply #5 on: Jul 19, 2016, 14:47:46 »
sounds like love at first sight Roy! lets hope you are kicking off the good observing and  imaging in the near future

Fay
It is healthier to be mutton dressed as lamb, than mutton dressed as mutton!

Fay

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Re: Observing Tonight
« Reply #6 on: Jul 19, 2016, 14:49:58 »
i am wondering if it is the same as Robert had with his Paramount
It is healthier to be mutton dressed as lamb, than mutton dressed as mutton!