Author Topic: InSight Mission to Mars  (Read 461 times)

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Rick

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InSight Mission to Mars
« on: Mar 05, 2015, 13:41:16 »
Single Site on Mars Advanced for 2016 NASA Lander

NASA's next mission to Mars, scheduled to launch one year from today to examine the Red Planet's deep interior and investigate how rocky planets like Earth evolved, now has one specific site under evaluation as the best place to land and deploy its science instruments.

The mission called InSight -- an acronym for "Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport" -- is scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The launch period runs from March 4 to March 30, 2016, and will mark the first California launch of an interplanetary mission. Installation of science-instrument hardware onto the spacecraft has begun and a key review has given thumbs up to integration and testing of the mission's component systems from several nations participating in the international project.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4501
And: http://insight.jpl.nasa.gov

Rick

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NASA Begins Testing Mars Lander for Next Mission to Red Planet
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2015, 08:14:17 »
NASA Begins Testing Mars Lander for Next Mission to Red Planet

Testing is underway on NASA's next mission on the journey to Mars, a stationary lander scheduled to launch in March 2016.

The lander is called InSight, an abbreviation for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport. It is about the size of a car and will be the first mission devoted to understanding the interior structure of the Red Planet. Examining the planet's deep interior could reveal clues about how all rocky planets, including Earth, formed and evolved.

The current testing will help ensure InSight can operate in and survive deep space travel and the harsh conditions of the Martian surface. The spacecraft will lift off from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, and land on Mars about six months later.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4601

Rick

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NASA Mars Orbiter Preparing for Mars Lander's 2016 Arrival
« Reply #2 on: Jul 30, 2015, 08:19:52 »
NASA Mars Orbiter Preparing for Mars Lander's 2016 Arrival

July 29, 2014 (4:10 p.m. PT) NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter successfully completed a maneuver on July 29, 2015, to put the spacecraft in the right place on Sept. 28, 2016, for supporting arrival of the InSight Mars lander mission. The maneuver's engine burn began at 6:21:31 a.m. PDT (13:21:31 UTC) and lasted for 75 seconds.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=4670

Rick

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NASA Targets May 2018 Launch of Mars InSight Mission
« Reply #3 on: Mar 18, 2016, 09:45:50 »
NASA Targets May 2018 Launch of Mars InSight Mission

NASA's Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight) mission to study the deep interior of Mars is targeting a new launch window that begins May 5, 2018, with a Mars landing scheduled for Nov. 26, 2018.

InSight's primary goal is to help us understand how rocky planets -- including Earth -- formed and evolved. The spacecraft had been on track to launch this month until a vacuum leak in its prime science instrument prompted NASA in December to suspend preparations for launch.

InSight project managers recently briefed officials at NASA and France's space agency, Centre National d'√Čtudes Spatiales (CNES), on a path forward; the proposed plan to redesign the science instrument was accepted in support of a 2018 launch.

More: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=5746

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NASA's Next Mars Mission to Investigate Interior of Red Planet
« Reply #4 on: Sep 08, 2017, 09:19:49 »
NASA's Next Mars Mission to Investigate Interior of Red Planet

Preparation of NASA's next spacecraft to Mars, InSight, has ramped up this summer, on course for launch next May from Vandenberg Air Force Base in central California -- the first interplanetary launch in history from America's West Coast.

Lockheed Martin Space Systems is assembling and testing the InSight spacecraft in a clean room facility near Denver. "Our team resumed system-level integration and test activities last month," said Stu Spath, spacecraft program manager at Lockheed Martin. "The lander is completed and instruments have been integrated onto it so that we can complete the final spacecraft testing including acoustics, instrument deployments and thermal balance tests."

InSight is the first mission to focus on examining the deep interior of Mars. Information gathered will boost understanding of how all rocky planets formed, including Earth.

More: https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6934